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Eggless Pancakes — Breakfast at Clique-any’s

Pancakes made with sugar? Believe it or not, the result is just sweet enough to work.

Eggless Pancakes 150 Eggless Pancakes    Breakfast at Clique anysIn my continuing journey to find allergy-free recipes that my son, who has reactions to soy and egg, would enjoy, I have come upon a number of variations for homemade pancakes. One that has popped up numerous times on various websites has been a recipe that has included sugar in the batter.

In my previous pancake adventures I had never used sugar, so I thought that this was a bit wonky, Yet, according to my family, the end result is still delicious with a bit of sweetness to it. Another success to add to the list! Now, if we could only remove soy and egg from every other recipe we would be golden.

Eggless Pancakes

printer famfamfam Eggless Pancakes    Breakfast at Clique anys Print This Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup flour
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1 cup of milk
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons of sugar
  • 2 1/2 tablespoons of pure canola, sunflower or olive oil

Dry ingredients go first — flour, baking powder and sugar. Stir until blended. Add the milk and the oil; stirring rapidly until the batter is smooth.

Heat a pan or griddle to medium. Pour 1/4 cup of batter onto the heated surface. As you as you see the pancakes bubble and their edges turn a golden brown,  flip them over. Remove from the hot surface when the bottom is a golden brown as well. Should make somewhere in the area of 6 to 8 pancakes; enough for two to three people.

Photo Credit: Richard Keller/CliqueClack

3 Responses to “Eggless Pancakes — Breakfast at Clique-any’s”

January 4, 2010 at 10:30 AM

The pancakes we make have a little honey or maple syrup in them too, and it does come out great.

When Owen was allergic to eggs, we used the Ener-G Egg Replacer with good results in most of our recipes. Vegan recipes are another good source of egg-free fare.

January 4, 2010 at 10:33 AM

Ener-G is a good substitute, but it costs somewhere in the area of $6 a box at your local natural food store. Lately, I’ve been using substitutes that provide a better hold and texture than powdered substitute egg.

January 4, 2010 at 3:24 PM

Well, that $6 box gets you a lot of eggs. You can use other substitutes, of course, but a lot of the time I’ve noticed you can taste that there’s … something different in the recipe.